http://www.lydianolan.com/train-to-taos-a-novel/

This is the beginning of my coming novel, "Taos."  It's not unlikely you will be wondering just what kind of book this is.

I like to think of it as a "gown-up," having not grown up until something traumatic slaps her in the face, and that is exactly what happens. She is slapped in the face with information pertaining to the case she is on.

Matilda "Two Crows" Morton is a Ph.D., Criminal Psychologist, who was just picked up by the New Mexico State Police, and she is partner and detective working the field, but belonging to the Analytics Department of Forensics. Why this is all important is because lines get cloudy when you're new, and especially when you are partnered for a reason that has nothing to do with the job, but more about who you are and what connection you have with the case.

Matilda is partnered no less with a man who more than turns her on; he turns her life around from being a secretly suicidal person, but becoming hopeful about life and love. The issue in this novel is about how traumatic information feeds into someone's journey to self-discovery and how one person deals with it.

I have been working on this novel for quite some time. I keep reading about other writers, some authors who took a long time in writing their breakout novel, and some, of course, became very famous (think of Margaret Mitchell, "Gone with the Wind,") and so I am hopeful and patient, applying every known lesson and education I am given by conventions, friends, and other authors, and editing, re-editing, and re-re-editing this 400 pg. fiction of a particular life.

I will tell you that I've read a number of authors who have claimed that it is a great help to keep a journal on the book. So I went out and bought me a notebook JUST for my novel, it being called "The Taos Journal."

Why I opened this blog was to trace steps into the world of becoming a novelist. I had written short stories, poetry, song lyrics even, and a couple of screenplays, all of which do not seem to me as difficult as this novel has. And, most importantly I have learned things along the way of writing this novel, that no one could have ever explained to me until I actually experienced it. I am going to try and blog about those little experiences. This I think is what makes a novelist a novelist, and a good one, even a great one, which is my aspiration.

Someday, we all have to leave earth, and all of us in some way want to leave something behind for prosperity, a legacy of hope, love, some kind of inspiration for the young to continue and for the old to hold on. That is my desire for becoming a writer, and especially a novelist.

I was always told I talk too much as a child. Now I talk too much but I will use that gift for my novels.

Starting next month I will share some of the things I have learned (like epiphanies) from just going through the "novel' journey.

Until next month, hang in there, make your life count for good.

Yours,
Lydia

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